Beth Jeans Houghton and the Hooves of Destiny

Jun 21, 2012 - 2KHz, London, England

Jun 21, 2012

Beth Jeans Houghton and the Hooves of Destiny

Tracks

  1. 1 Welcome to Daytrotter
  2. 2 Dodecahedron
  3. 3 Atlas
  4. 4 Franklin Benedict

Golden Demons And Crimson Sight

Words by Sean Moeller, Illustration by Johnnie Cluney, Recording engineered by Ian Grimble and Richard Matthews, by Communion Music, at 2KHz at Church Studios, Crouch End, London

The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse come marauding through the New Testament of the Bible, riding white, red, black and pale horses. They're said to represent Conquest, War, Famine and Death and they are meant to set a divine apocalypse on the world as the harbingers of the Last Judgment. It's all a bit hairy, but everyone's got a job to do. They're just there performing the role of someone warning that they're all going to be road kill soon enough and there's not going to be anyone around to come by and shovel them off the roads. They'll just sit there and rot in the sun. It's not quite clear if these harbingers or their horses will survive - for their participation in the upheaval and wipeout - but if they are, it's surely going to stink to high heaven.

Beth Jeans Houghton and the Hooves of Destiny make music that seems like it could be the artistic expression of the close friends or lovers of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse - those who are aware of what's going to happen, who are prepared for the worst and who decide to just slag everything off and go riding with them as they make their fateful runs out of the gate - for once and for all. They're going to be along for the ride, as bumpy as it might wind up being. "Dodecahedron," is a song that comes out of a night's worth of dreaming, where the image of a twelve-sided die came into the picture and the possibilities that could come from any of the rolls with such a thing are great. Within the first moments of the song, Houghton is singing about her eyes bleeding with "crimson sight" and that she's doing everything she can to release the "golden demons," letting them take flight.

It's certainly a bit frightening on the surface, but the way she takes us by the hand, through those nightmarish valleys and dales, we're smitten with what's happening, with the images that are going by us. She sings on "Franklin Benedict," "You see that I've been falling/You see what I've been through/You see that I've been calling/For better or worse/I'm calling for you," and the point is made that there's been a mess of trouble in her life for a while and there's only one way to avail it. It might be by letting the demons and the horsemen loose.

Beth Jeans Houghton Official Site

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