The Coasts

Dec 17, 2012 - Daytrotter Studio, Rock Island, IL


The Coasts

Tracks

  1. 1 Welcome to Daytrotter
  2. 2 Homebody
  3. 3 Poltergeist
  4. 4 Santa Fe
  5. 5 Lullabye

The Phobic Life Of Hearts

Words by Sean Moeller, Illustration by Johnnie Cluney, Recording engineered by Mike Gentry

The strain of thought in the words of Little Rock, Arkansas, band The Coasts is quite involved. It deals with so many personal issues - even very generic and widespread ones - that we're sure very few if any will ever be resolved. One thing is for sure and that is that there's no chance they'll get fixed in a two-and-a-half-minute garage rock song. These are deep-seeded issues of phobias and anxieties are going to stick to these wayfarers like glue. These people might go out to parties, but they're never going to feel comfortable at them. They're going to need a shit-load of beers to get to any comfortable state, where they don't just feel like nervous little alien men.

The first song in this session, entitled "Homebody," is a perfect example of where they're coming from. The protagonist is riddled with doubt, willing to make up any old excuse he can think of - flimsy or not - to not have to go out to a party. He's sick. He just doesn't want to. He'd rather just watch movies in the comfort of his own home, not at all caring if he's missing an epic night of excitement and debauchery. It's the excitement and the debauchery that he wants most to avoid. So, he does. He avoids it all - the idea of being crushed up against others, awkwardly forced into conversations with complete strangers being somewhat of a debilitating one. He'd rather just be home. It's safer that way.

In "Santa Fe," there's a person who is just not able to bring himself to get to New Mexico, even if that's where his heart wants him to go. There is this inner struggle that makes everything a challenge, where the worries are getting the better of a man. These worries are making the man phobic and they guide his hand. Even on "Lullabye," with the feel of a 50s or 60s rhythm and blues number, where the mood is dreamy and idyllic - that of love prevailing against all odds, you get the sense that there's a problem, as The Coasts sing, "I can't be here with you all the time/But I can try." They won't be here all that often. They're going to be at home, watching movies.

The Coasts Official Site

Session Comments